Which Two Lines in the Poem Indicate Its Theme

Pattern of rhymes at the finish of each line of a poem or song

A
rhyme scheme
is the design of rhymes at the stop of each line of a poem or vocal. It is usually referred to past using letters to indicate which lines rhyme; lines designated with the same letter all rhyme with each other.

An example of the ABAB rhyming scheme, from “To Anthea, who may Command him Anything”, by Robert Herrick:

Bid me to weep, and I will cry A
While I accept eyes to come across B
And having none, yet I volition keep A
A eye to weep for thee B

Function in writing

[edit]

These rhyme patterns take various effects, and can be used to:

  • Command flow: If every line has the same rhyme (AAAA), the stanza volition read as having a very quick flow, whereas a rhyme scheme like ABCABC can exist felt to unfold more slowly.
  • Structure a poems message and thought patterns: For instance, a unproblematic couplet with a rhyme scheme of AABB lends itself to simpler straight ideas, because the resolution comes in the very next line. Essentially these couplets can exist thought of as self-contained statements. This thought of rhyme schemes reflecting thought processes is often discussed specially regarding sonnets.
  • Make up one’s mind whether a stanza is balanced or unbalanced
  • Help to reinforce the feeling beingness expressed: If the writer wants to limited stubbornness, they may use tight structured rhyme schemes, whereas if i was writing almost feeling lost, so perhaps the stanza would only take 1 rhyme (XXAXXXA).

A basic distinction is between rhyme schemes that utilize to a single stanza, and those that continue their pattern throughout an entire poem (come across chain rhyme). At that place are likewise more elaborate related forms, similar the sestina – which requires repetition of exact words in a circuitous pattern. Rhyming is not a mandatory feature of poetry; a four line stanza with non-rhyming lines could be described as using the scheme ABCD.

Note and examples

[edit]

Notation used beneath:

  • ABAB – Four-line stanza, get-go and third lines rhyme at the end, second and fourth lines rhyme at the cease.
  • AB AB – 2 two-line stanzas, with the commencement lines rhyming at the end and the second lines rhyming at the end.
  • AB,AB – Single two-line stanza, with the two lines having both a single internal rhyme and a conventional rhyme at the terminate.
  • aBaB – Two dissimilar possible meanings for a iv-line stanza:
    • Outset and third lines rhyme at the end, second and 4th lines are repeated verbatim.
    • First and third lines have a feminine rhyme and the second and 4th lines have a masculine rhyme.
  • AiabAii
    A1abA2
    – Two stanzas, where the first lines of both stanzas are exactly the same, and the terminal lines of both stanzas are the same. The second lines of the two stanzas are unlike, just rhyme at the end with the first and last lines. (In other words, all the “A” and “a” lines rhyme with each other, but not with the “b” lines.)
  • XAXA – Four lines, two unrhymed (Ten) and two with the same stop rhyme (A)
Read:   Which of the Following Helped the Middle Colonies to Thrive

Notable rhyme schemes and forms that use specific rhyme schemes:

  • Ballad stanza: ABCB
  • Ballade: Three stanzas of ABABBCBC followed past BCBC
  • Balliol rhyme: AABB
  • Boy Named Sue: AABCC(B, or infrequently D)
  • Bref double: AXBC XAXC AXAB AB and other schemes, where “X” represents unrhymed lines
  • Burns stanza: AAABAB(B) or AABCCCB
  • Canopus:[1]
    ABABCBC
  • Chant imperial: Five stanzas of ababccddedE followed by either ddedE or ccddedE (capital letter messages represent lines repeated verbatim)
  • Chastushka: ABAB, ABCB, or AABB
  • Cinquain: ABABB[
    citation needed
    ]
  • Clerihew: AABB
  • Couplet: AA, simply usually occurs every bit AA BB CC DD …
  • Décima: ABBAACCDDC
  • Double dactyl: XXXA XXXA
  • Enclosed rhyme (or enclosing rhyme): ABBA
  • Englyn: complex structure
  • “Burn down and Ice” stanza: ABAABCBCB every bit used in Robert Frost’s poem “Fire and Ice”
  • Keatsian Ode: ABABCDECDE used in Keats’ Ode on Indolence, Ode on a Grecian Urn, and Ode to a Nightingale.
  • Klin: circuitous structure
  • Limerick: AABBA
  • Monorhyme: AAAAA… an identical rhyme on every line, common in Latin and Arabic
  • Octave: ABBA ABBA
  • Onegin stanzas: aBaBccDDeFFeGG with the lowercase letters representing feminine rhymes and the capital representing masculine rhymes, written in iambic tetrameter
  • Ottava rima: ABABABCC
  • A quatrain is any iv-line stanza or poem. There are fifteen possible rhyme sequences for a four-line poem; common rhyme schemes for these include AAAA, AABB, ABAB, ABBA, and ABCB.[
    commendation needed
    ]
  • “The Raven” stanza: ABCBBB, or AA,B,CC,CB,B,B when accounting for internal rhyme, as used by Edgar Allan Poe in his poem “The Raven”
  • Rhyme royal: ABABBCC
  • The Route Not Taken
    stanza: ABAAB equally used in Robert Frost’s poem
    The Road Non Taken, and in Glæde over Danmark by Poul Martin Møller.[2]
  • Rondeau: ABaAabAB (capital letter messages represent lines repeated verbatim)
  • Rondelet: AbAabbA (uppercase letters represent lines repeated verbatim)
  • Rubaiyat: AABA or AAAA
  • Sapphic stanza in Polish poesy – diverse
  • Scottish stanza: AAABAB, as used by Robert Burns in works such as “To a Mouse”
  • Sestain: AABBCC, ABABCC, AABCCB, AAABAB, and others
  • Sestet: various schemes depending on the country
  • Sestina: ABCDEF FAEBDC CFDABE ECBFAD DEACFB BDFECA, the seventh stanza is a tercet where line 1 has A in it simply ends with D, line ii has B in information technology but ends with Due east, line 3 has C in it but ends with F
  • Sestuplo-nel-quintetto: Any quantity of stanzas of AABCCB, occasionally followed by either a repeating pattern of BCCB, or AA, plainly.[
    citation needed
    ]
  • Sicilian octave: ABABABAB
  • Simple 4-line: ABCB
  • Sonnet, 14 lines:
    • 4 + 4 + three + 3 lines:
      • Petrarchan sonnet: ABBA ABBA CDE CDE or ABBA ABBA CDC DCD
    • 4 + 4 + 4 + ii lines
      • Shakespearean sonnet: ABAB CDCD EFEF GG
      • Spenserian sonnet: ABAB BCBC CDCD EE
  • Spenserian stanza: ABABBCBCC, where the terminal line is an alexandrine line
  • Spenserian sonnet: ABAB BCBC CDCD EE
  • Stopping by Woods on a Snowy Evening
    form: AABA BBCB CCDC DDDD, a modified Ruba’i stanza used by Robert Frost for the eponymous poem
  • Tail rhyme: B lines announced intermittently
  • Tanaga: traditional Tagalog tanaga is AABB
  • Terza rima: ABA BCB CDC …, ending on YZY Z; YZY ZZ; or YZY ZYZ
  • A tristich or tercet is whatever three-line stanza or verse form; common rhyme schemes for these are AAA (triplet) and ABA (enclosed tercet). The merely other possibilities for 3-line poems are AAB, ABB, and ABC. Multiple tercets can exist combined into longer poems, as in the terza rima grade.
  • Traditional rhyme: ABAB CDCD EFEF GHGH…
  • Triolet: ABaAabAB and others
  • Triplet: AAA, often repeating such as: AAA BBB CCC DDD…
  • Trova: XAXA
  • Villanelle: A1bA2
    abAone
    abAii
    abA1
    abAtwo
    abA1Aii, where Aone
    and Aii
    are lines repeated exactly which rhyme with the “a” lines
Read:   Distance From Great Britain Mayflower Compact Town Hall Meetings

In hip-hop music

[edit]

Hip-hop music and rapping’southward rhyme schemes include traditional schemes such as couplets, also every bit forms specific to the genre,[3]
which are broken down extensively in the books
How to Rap
and
Book of Rhymes. Rhyme schemes used in hip-hop music include

  • Couplets[4]
  • Single-liners[5]
  • Multi-liners[half-dozen]
  • Combinations of schemes[7]
  • Whole poesy[viii]

Couplets are the most mutual type of rhyme scheme in old school rap[9]
and are nonetheless regularly used,[4]
though complex rhyme schemes have progressively become more frequent.[10]
[11]
Rather than relying on end rhymes, rap’due south rhyme schemes tin can accept rhymes placed anywhere in the confined of music to create a structure.[12]
At that place tin can too be numerous rhythmic elements which all work together in the same scheme[13]
– this is called internal rhyme in traditional poetry,[14]
though as rap’s rhymes schemes can be anywhere in the bar, they could all be internal, so the term is not e’er used.[13]
Rap verses tin likewise utilise ‘extra rhymes’, which do not structure the verse like the main rhyme schemes, but which add to the overall sound of the poesy.[15]

Number of rhyme schemes for a poem with
n
lines


[edit]

The number of unlike possible rhyme schemes for an
n-line poem is given by the Bell numbers,[16]
which for
n = 1, ii, 3, … are

1, 2, 5, xv, 52, 203, 877, 4140, 21147, 115975, .. (sequence
A000110
in the OEIS).

Examples: Nosotros detect one rhyme scheme for a one-line poem (A), two different rhyme schemes for a two-line poem (AA, AB), and five for a three-line poem: AAA, AAB, ABA, ABB, and ABC.

Read:   Which Vessels Allow for Oxygen Movement Into the Tissues

These counts, all the same, include rhyme schemes in which rhyme is non employed at all (ABCD). There are many fewer rhyme schemes when all lines must rhyme with at to the lowest degree one other line; a count of these is given past the numbers,

0, 1, 1, 4, xi, 41, 162, 715, 3425, 17722, … (sequence
A000296
in the OEIS).

For example, for a 3-line poem, there is only one rhyming scheme in which every line rhymes with at least one other (AAA), while for a four-line verse form, at that place are four such schemes (AABB, ABAB, ABBA, and AAAA).

References

[edit]


  1. ^


    “ababcbc – Verse Forms”.
    poetscollective.org
    . Retrieved
    2017-11-15
    .



  2. ^

    Glæde over Danmark – English translation

  3. ^

    Edwards, Paul, 2009,
    How to Rap: The Art & Science of the Hip-Hop MC, Chicago Review Press, p. 95–110.
  4. ^


    a




    b



    Edwards, Paul, 2009,
    How to Rap: The Art & Science of the Hip-Hop MC, Chicago Review Press, p. 99.

  5. ^

    Edwards, Paul, 2009,
    How to Rap: The Art & Science of the Hip-Hop MC, Chicago Review Press, p. 100.

  6. ^

    Edwards, Paul, 2009,
    How to Rap: The Fine art & Science of the Hip-Hop MC, Chicago Review Printing, p. 101.

  7. ^

    Edwards, Paul, 2009,
    How to Rap: The Fine art & Science of the Hip-Hop MC, Chicago Review Press, p. 101–102.

  8. ^

    Edwards, Paul, 2009,
    How to Rap: The Art & Science of the Hip-Hop MC, Chicago Review Printing, p. 102–103.

  9. ^

    Bradley, Adam, 2009,
    Book of Rhymes: The Poetics of Hip-Hop, Basic Civitas Books, p. 50.

  10. ^

    Edwards, Paul, 2009,
    How to Rap Like A Star: The Fine art & Scientific discipline of the Hip-Hop MC, Chicago Review Press, p. 97.

  11. ^

    Bradley, Adam, 2009,
    Volume of Rhymes: The Poetics of Hip-Hop, Basic Civitas Books, p. 73.

  12. ^

    Edwards, Paul, 2009,
    How to Rap: The Fine art & Science of the Hip-Hop MC, Chicago Review Press, p. 107.
  13. ^


    a




    b



    Edwards, Paul, 2009,
    How to Rap: The Art & Science of the Hip-Hop MC, Chicago Review Printing, p. 104.

  14. ^

    Bradley, Adam, 2009,
    Book of Rhymes: The Poetics of Hip-Hop, Basic Civitas Books, p. 74.

  15. ^

    Edwards, Paul, 2009,
    How to Rap: The Art & Science of the Hip-Hop MC, Chicago Review Press, p. 103.

  16. ^


    Gardner, Martin (1978), “The Bells: versatile numbers that can count partitions of a set, primes and fifty-fifty rhymes”,
    Scientific American,
    238: 24–30, doi:10.1038/scientificamerican0578-24

    . Reprinted with an addendum every bit “The Tinkly Temple Bells”, Chapter two of
    Fractal Music, Hypercards, and more … Mathematical Recreations from Scientific American, W. H. Freeman, 1992, pp. 24–38.

External links

[edit]


  • Learning materials related to Rhyme schemes by set partition at Wikiversity



Which Two Lines in the Poem Indicate Its Theme

Source: https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Rhyme_scheme

Check Also

Which Book Citations Are Formatted Correctly Check All That Apply

By Vladimir Gjorgiev/Shutterstock Concealer is an essential part of any makeup routine. It’s many women’s …